February 2018 | Wesley Ridge Retirement Community

A Healthy Twist to Your Classic Chili

Whether it’s game day and you’re hosting family, or you’re cuddled up on the couch for movie night, chili is always a staple! It’s something about that warm bowl that makes gatherings even more enjoyable. Next time you’re preparing your favorite comfort food, try this healthy Turkey Chili recipe. Not to mention, it can be recreated in less that 20 minutes. So, whether you are running errands before company comes over, or you have a busy evening of soccer games, the recipe by Wesley Ridge Chef, Glen Hall-Jones, won’t disappoint!

Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons canola or corn oil
  • 1 medium or large onion, chopped
  • 1 pound 4 ounces ground skinless turkey breast
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced, or 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 15.5-ounce can no-salt-added pinto beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 15.5-ounce can no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 14.5-ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 3/4 cups fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup frozen whole-kernel corn
  • 1 6-ounce can no-salt-added tomato paste
  • 4 medium green onions, green part only, sliced

Directions

  1. Lightly spray a Dutch oven with cooking spray. Add the oil and heat over medium-high heat, swirling to coat the bottom. Cook the onion for 3 minutes, or until soft, stirring occasionally.
  2. Reduce the heat to medium. Stir in the turkey. Cook for 5 minutes, or until browned, stirring frequently to turn and break up the turkey.
  3. Stir in the garlic, chili powder, pepper, and cumin. Stir in the remaining ingredients except for the green onions.  Cook for 5 to 7 minutes, or until heated through, stirring frequently. Just before serving, sprinkle with the green onions.

Serves 6; 1 1/3 cups per serving

We love chili in the spring and winter, what is your favorite season for this ultimate comfort food?

 


How to Love Your Loved One When They Have a Life Limiting Illness

By: Peg Carmany

When someone you love is diagnosed with a life limiting illness, it may be a time when the kaleidoscope of your life suddenly snaps into focus. Or it may be a time when the laser focus of your life becomes scattered. And very likely, there will be some of both. Of the research I have done, and the practical tips I can share from my own experience, these are my favorite pieces of advice:

1. Remember there is no right answer on how you’re supposed to act, and you should not assume that you are supposed to know exactly what to do and exactly how to act. It’s OK to fall apart, but one word of caution about that: try not to let the person who is ill be your primary source of comfort when you do hit a wall.
2. When trying to follow Tip 1, remember that your established role with this loved one doesn’t necessarily switch at the moment of diagnosis. Perhaps only one of you has ever been good under stress? It’s okay to keep it that way. Both of you may take great comfort in continuing on with familiar patterns.
3. Make it a priority to show your love as your loved one is facing what may be overwhelming and scary. It’s not all roses and chocolates – be authentic, be honest, and be yourself. Express gratitude to them for how they have positively impacted your life – and share happy memories – and don’t be afraid to say goodbye, tenderly.
4. Respect their authority to make their own decisions, whether you like it or not. These are their choices, not yours.
5. Keep things as normal as possible. Continue watching your favorite tv shows together or listening to their favorite music, it can be a very meaningful thing.
6. Laugh when you can, and don’t be afraid to poke a little fun at the whole situation. A sense of humor will lighten any mood!
7. And perhaps most importantly: listen, and give advice only when asked. This one can be the most challenging. Often, we are great talkers, but not the best listeners.

Remember, your loved one needs your emotional support. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Often family and friends who live near by are more than willing to help with errands. And, if you need further support, Wesley Hospice can visit your home, the community you live in, and even hospitals.

We send our deepest condolences to the families who are faced with a loved one being diagnosed with a life limiting illness. And, we hope that with these tips you’ll be able to better love your loved one during this time.